May 21, 2012

Is Segregation Back in U.S. Public Schools?

Posted in Education tagged , at 9:34 PM by minoritybrief

Last week marked the 58th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, which declared racial segregation of public schools unconstitutional. But segregation, now due largely to geography, still remains an issue for most school systems, from New York City to Charlotte, N.C., and beyond. In his article in The Sunday Review, David L. Kirp, the author of “Kids First,” said that “desegregation is effectively dead.”

How can we integrate public schools when neighborhoods have become more segregated? Is it time to bring back busing? What other options and solutions are out there for providing a quality education for all children?

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March 15, 2012

Impact of Recession Still Being Felt by Children, Schools

Posted in Education, Poverty at 6:20 PM by minoritybrief

According to recent reports, the economy is showing signs of recovery.  But the impact of the recession, particularly on children, will be felt far into the future.

As the foreclosure crisis and continued unemployment push poverty to record levels , many Americans are sliding into homelessness.  The Obama Administration estimates that family homelessness increased by 20 percent from 2007 to 2010 .

And while the loss of a home is traumatic for anyone, it is especially so for children.  The mental, emotional, and economic consequences can extend far into adulthood.

More from the Huffington Post…

June 11, 2011

N.A.A.C.P. on Defensive as Suit on Charter Schools Splits Group’s Supporters

Posted in Education tagged , at 11:20 AM by minoritybrief

By FERNANDA SANTOS

In some ways, it seems like a natural cause for the N.A.A.C.P.: students — many of them poor, most of them black — treated as second-class citizens when the public schools they attended had to share buildings with charter schools. A lawsuit filed last month by the N.A.A.C.P. and the United Federation of Teachers described children having to eat lunch so early it might as well be breakfast, and getting less exercise because gym hours were evenly divided between the schools despite big differences in their enrollment sizes.

But black children have been major constituents of charter schools since their creation two decades ago. So when thousands of charter-school parents, students and advocates staged a rally on May 26 in Harlem, it was not so much to denounce the litigation as it was to criticize the involvement of the N.A.A.C.P.

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April 21, 2010

Ruling on racial isolation in Miss. schools reflects troubling broader trend

Posted in Education tagged , , at 12:00 PM by minoritybrief

TYLERTOWN, MISS. — During her elementary school years in this rural Mississippi town, Addreal Harness, a competitive teenager with plans to be a doctor, said her classes had about the same numbers of white and black students. It was a fact she took little note of until the white kids began leaving.

Some left in seventh grade, even more in eighth, and by the time Harness, who is African American, reached Tylertown High School, she became aware of talk that has slowly seeped into her 16-year-old psyche — that some white parents call Tylertown “the black school,” while Salem Attendance Center, where many of her white classmates transferred, is known as “the white school.”

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April 15, 2010

Test, Punish, and Push Out: How Zero Tolerance and High-Stakes Testing Funnel Youth into the School to Prison Pipeline

Posted in Education tagged at 10:49 AM by minoritybrief

“Test, Punish, and Push Out” provides an overview of zero-tolerance school discipline and high-stakes testing, how they relate to each other, how laws and policies such as the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) have made school discipline even more punitive, and the risk faced if these devastating policies are not reformed. The report explores:

* The common origins and ideological roots of zero tolerance and high- stakes testing;

* The current state of zero-tolerance school discipline across the country, including local, state, and national data;

* How high-stakes testing affects students, educators, and schools;

* How zero tolerance and high-stakes testing have become mutually reinforcing, combining to push huge numbers of students out of school; and

* Successful grassroots efforts to eliminate harmful discipline and testing practices.